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Ner's Random Musings on a life of interesting insights

a world of interesting factoids about nothing and everything


December 6th, 2007

The oven, interviews, and the Faith in America Speech @ 06:26 pm

Sadly, I've felt like sleeping most of the day, well half of the day that is. I'll have time and energy, hopefully, to write the short introduction that my thesis requires and try also to get througha nother page of idol entries, and if I can do both of those (thesis being the more important thing), I'll be even more happy than I am now.

I'm sitting here drinking some peprmint tea, and it's quite a refreshing thing, even though it's just pushing the mid fifties, not too cold but still cool enough for hot liquid.

I was excited to find out that I had a refill on my cough syrup last night. It oddly put me in the frame of mind of "what would I do if this was my last jar of mayonaise and the world didn't make mayonaise anymore?" (I was making a sandwich), :What would I do if I had no cough syrup refill? What would I do if antibiotics didn't exist?", and other morbid and antiquarian questions. Guess I've been reading too many apocalyptic books lately (S. M. Stirling is one of my favorite authors).

We lost our only working oven today. This is bad, especially since when it's my night to cook, I generally use the oven. It's even more apocalyptic since I now am unable to make tasty cookieish things. *sigh* At least I can make no-bake cookies, something I'm prety good at as well. So Jessica and Josh are out there now making baked chicken and asparagus on the stove top. We're hoping and praying that it will be ok. There is one good sign, and that is that it smells wonderful out there at the moment.

I'm getting more excited about the string of interviews I'll have on Tuesday. They sent me an email with my planned-out schedule, and I've got seven interviews planned with seven pretty high-up people in the company. They say this is standard operating procedure, but I don't think they follow the S.O.P. for all applicants. I'll do a presentation/demo of my system for simulation at some point in the day, and hopefully I can convince them that I can get the job done and be a producttive and valuable asset to the company. At least they seem excited that I am going to be coming.


I listened to the speech by Mit Romney today on faith. I'm not a Republican, but I was interested in his views, especially since we share the same religious beliefs. I'm also really not sure who I will vote for in the coming election, so I've been paying attention to both sides.

I'm glad that Romney made the speech that he did, but I'm not exactly sure what it will accomplish with the Evangellical Christians that he's hoping to woo. Many Evangellicals have deep-rooted views that Mormons are not Christians, and just because a politician tells them that he will not be swayed by the authorities of his church, they will not be swayed by his "rhetoric". I was happy that he didn't go into deep church doctrinal things in his speech, that would have inflamed things even further with those on both extremes of the religious devide, but I am glad that he reitterated that we believe in Jesus Christ as our Savior.

The thing that makes me sad is the fact that in this day and age, whether or not we are Democrat or Republican, we (as politicians or voters) must consider religion. To me, religion is a very presonal thing. So though values may influence my vote in 2008, I'm not going to vote for Romney just because he's Mormon, and I'dhope that others, if they agree with Romney, would not vote for him just because he is Mormon.

I liked his statement about why he had to accept other's beliefs:

"There is one fundamental question about which I often am asked. What do I believe about Jesus Christ? I believe that Jesus Christ is the Son of God and
the Savior of mankind. My church's beliefs about Christ may not all be the same as those of other faiths. Each religion has its own unique doctrines and
history. These are not bases for criticism but rather a test of our tolerance. Religious tolerance would be a shallow principle indeed if it were reserved
only for faiths with which we agree.

"There are some who would have a presidential candidate describe and explain his church's distinctive doctrines. To do so would enable the very religious
test the founders prohibited in the Constitution. No candidate should become the spokesman for his faith. For if he becomes President he will need the
prayers of the people of all faiths.
-- Source: http://www.mittromney.com/News/Speeches/Faith_In_America


So though I don't agree with any of the parties these days, I do applaud Romney's sentiments on religious inclusion. I guess if we must talk about it, if it must become an issue, the sobeit. I just hope that this care about religious fervor does not extend from the political arena into forcing me, or anyone for that matter, to believe in one certain faith.

I'll close with this final quote.


"Recall the early days of the First Continental Congress in Philadelphia, during the fall of 1774. With Boston occupied by British troops, there were rumors
of imminent hostilities and fears of an impending war. In this time of peril, someone suggested that they pray. But there were objections. 'They were too
divided in religious sentiments', what with Episcopalians and Quakers, Anabaptists and Congregationalists, Presbyterians and Catholics.

"Then Sam Adams rose, and said he would hear a prayer from anyone of piety and good character, as long as they were a patriot.

"And so together they prayed, and together they fought, and together, by the grace of God ... they founded this great nation.
-- Same source




More soon, dinner's ready. Hope I enjoy this new experiment.
 
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Comments

 
From:ds4king
Date:December 8th, 2007 06:10 pm (UTC)
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I do like your take on Romney's speech. I honestly do not understand how a person refuses to vote for another person based on his religion. This is politics, not an election within the Church. I thought the issue was settled when JFK ran as the first Catholic, but it hasn't has it? I truly believe that one is never defined by their religion - not the Pope, Dali Lama, you, me, or anyone. Religion is apart of you but it does not define you.
I know there is more gray to the issue, with abortion, capital punishment, and more, however, one is suppose to separate their own personal feelings when representing the people who voted for them.
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From:djner
Date:December 9th, 2007 03:36 am (UTC)
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Thanks for your comment. Yes, I agree, just because someone is of my religion I'm not voting for them, and I hope someone wouldn't vote for someone just because they are a certain religion. JFK and Catholicism isn't as big of a deal as Romney and Mormonism. Per capita wise, the Mormon religion is much smaller, and therefore sometimes less accepted because of its misunderstandings in the world. At least Romney is bringing some good light to the religion, and helping people discuss it. That's a good thing.

Ner's Random Musings on a life of interesting insights

a world of interesting factoids about nothing and everything